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Poster: cashel Date: Jun 30, 2004 4:54pm
Forum: opensource_movies Subject: DIGITAL PIRACY or IS IT NONSENSE???

IT CHIC the movie clip is most relevant ,interseting and useful..My continuing respect for M.Moore has increased. After viewing, several thoughts came 1.I buy a book and lend it and nobody worries. The same should apply to Movies or Recorded Music. 2. I buy a book and I know that it will last my lifetime or longer . BUT when I buy a CD or DVD, I cannot be sure that even a year later, through natural causes( as mould viral attack ,etc) it will be rendered useless and unplayable. HOW MANY people have applied to Corporations for a refund ( their cases are unreported and receive NO publicity)???? I am tired of the CORPORATION GREED PROPAGANDA..

This post was modified by cashel on 2004-06-30 23:54:25

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Poster: summerseve Date: Jun 30, 2004 10:49pm
Forum: opensource_movies Subject: Re: DIGITAL PIRACY or IS IT NONSENSE???

All of which reminds me...why is file sharing considered legally actionable, when one can buy used CD's and videos anywhere?
I actually mean this as a serious question, not a veiled statement of opinion. Has there ever been a legal challenge to used record stores, etc? If so, wouldn't there be a precedent for the current situation? Any lawyers out there?

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Poster: Administrator, Curator, or Staffsimon c Date: Jul 1, 2004 12:46am
Forum: opensource_movies Subject: Re: DIGITAL PIRACY or IS IT NONSENSE???

Apparently (and I am not a lawyer!), the legitimacy of the resale of physical goods has got something to do with the doctrine of 'First Sale', which is defined (by somebody random) as:

''First sale' limits the rights of the holder of a Copyright from attempting to control the actions of the customer or third party following the initial sale of licensed goods.'

The only example I know of somebody trying to limit re-sale relates to Japanese videogames, where a number of publishers tried to have re-sale banned. I'm not sure they succeeded, but I've seen at least one Japanese game with a 'no resale' logo on it (!) - here's a (rather technical) article about one of the legal battles over this point:

http://superfami.com/sweeks.html

Still, it's in a large font, so that should make it easier to understand.

s!

PS - If you're filesharing, then you're not 're-selling' a recording, you're just making a new copy :) I believe iTunes has a EULA-based ban on re-sale (including deletion of the original item), too, but I'm not sure about that - that's the same kind of problem.

This post was modified by simon c on 2004-07-01 07:46:07

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Poster: aka it chic Date: Jul 1, 2004 3:00am
Forum: opensource_movies Subject: A Big Beautiful Cyber Spider Web

With the torrent sites you are not getting the complete file from one person, just a slice of it (and there are no shared drives). That is why there has been no issue with IP's being summoned through these sites. You can do a netstat and see who is connected and SOMETIMES it will resolve the IP address, but if you are into file sharing, this is the way to go and the downloads are a lot faster then WinMx (also many files on the WinMx etc carry viruses).
The sites themselves are having problems, Microsoft sent isohunt.com a cease and desist order for displaying their software (for download).
The Michael Moore clip was obtained from a torrent site
Ironic?


This post was modified by aka it chic on 2004-07-01 09:50:21

This post was modified by aka it chic on 2004-07-01 10:00:36

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Poster: summerseve Date: Jul 1, 2004 4:27am
Forum: opensource_movies Subject: Re: A Big Beautiful Cyber Spider Web

Seems like the law hasn't yet settled on the appropriate metaphors for the current era. With physical things, we could always refer back to apples and oranges, and who's got something in their own two hands--possession being "9/10ths of the law". Then in came the idea of intellectual property, and things got complicated, but at least that property was attached to, or contained in, a physical item. Now we're in some kind of "quantum" period, where the intellectual property can be separated from its physical carrier, transported anywhere, and re-assembled. It seems like we need a whole new legal...dare I say it...paradigm.
Ugh. Sorry about that.